Molten (BZ), Italy
Renovation and expansion with energy and super bonus upgrading of a two-family house
Client: Private

Collaborator:
Arch. Serena Santullo
Year:2020
Typology:two family house
ClimateHouse:A
Type of construction:mixed construction
Final result

The project consists of a contemporary redevelopment of two 1980s townhouses.
The first house is basically left as is, except for the ground floor extension on the south side. The result is a spacious room with a large living room and kitchen with an island; large French doors characterize the filter with the outside, which is very fluid given the size of the windows. Upstairs, the intervention takes the form of a large terrace serving the bedrooms.
The other house is - almost entirely - demolished and rebuilt. The new volume, larger than the previous one, is made entirely of wood, built according to green building standards to achieve a Climate House A standard.
On the ground floor there are a bathroom and a guest room, a study and a large kitchen-living room; the latter is defined by its horizontal tension on the east-west axis, aimed at celebrating, with its large French windows, the light and the view. The upper floor houses the sleeping area, with bedrooms and personal bathrooms.
The contemporary reconversion, seeking to dialogue with the pre-existences, proposes a cladding with staggered laths that give dynamism to the walls. The interplay of sharp lines and incisive cuts affects all exterior projecting elements: the balcony features bold, protruding edges while the roof is shaped by splays to maximize the entry of light into the interior. In addition, the roof, reconstructed from scratch, becomes, in the first house, a kind of shell that leans against the existing structure to unify the style and aesthetics of the two dwellings. The thickness of the roof is the common thread of the composition: it frames and unites all the pitches of the building, drawing a well-defined line that comes to life and ends in the north. At this point, a tunnel serves as an entrance to the dwellings; skylights and light points embedded in the wooden battens create a cut between the slope and the building.

The result is a spacious room with a large living room and kitchen with an island; large French doors characterize the filter with the outside, which is very fluid given the size of the windows. Upstairs, the intervention takes the form of a large terrace serving the bedrooms.
The other house is - almost entirely - demolished and rebuilt. The new volume, larger than the previous one, is made entirely of wood, built according to green building standards to achieve a Climate House A standard.
On the ground floor there are a bathroom and a guest room, a study and a large kitchen-living room; the latter is defined by its horizontal tension on the east-west axis, aimed at celebrating, with its large French windows, the light and the view. The upper floor houses the sleeping area, with bedrooms and personal bathrooms.
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The contemporary reconversion, seeking to dialogue with the pre-existences, proposes a cladding with staggered laths that give dynamism to the walls. The interplay of sharp lines and incisive cuts affects all exterior projecting elements: the balcony features bold, protruding edges while the roof is shaped by splays to maximize the entry of light into the interior. In addition, the roof, reconstructed from scratch, becomes, in the first house, a kind of shell that leans against the existing structure to unify the style and aesthetics of the two dwellings. The thickness of the roof is the common thread of the composition: it frames and unites all the pitches of the building, drawing a well-defined line that comes to life and ends in the north. At this point, a tunnel serves as an entrance to the dwellings; skylights and light points embedded in the wooden battens create a cut between the slope and the building.

Press & Media

Haus G - Dolomiten Spezial
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